Monthly Archives: June 2016

Summer Assignment!

With the academic year winding down (and already finished for some), take a moment to think about what you will be doing this summer.  I’m sure you are planning to relax and refresh, but don’t neglect recharging your professional batteries…

READ A BOOK.  Is there one on your teaching bookshelf that you’ve been meaning to read?  Here are a few that I’ve read recently or have on my “Pedagogy and Learning” list for this summer:

  • Make It Stick: The Science of Successful Learning by Brown, Roediger & McDaniel
  • 5 Practices for Orchestrating Productive Mathematics Discussions by Smith & Stein
  • Embedding Formative Assessment by William & Leahy
  • Mathematical Mindsets by Boaler

If you have the opportunity, find a “buddy” or group and read together.  Try one chapter a week and discuss in person or via email.  Our Teachers Teaching with Technology cadre of instructors did book “discussion chats” this past year.  Here are some ideas and prompts to organize your comments on Embedding Formative Assessment and 5 Practices (thanks Jennifer!)

And since it is summer, I’m also planning to do some fun math reads.  Consider these, or maybe there are others you have your eye on (tell me in the comments!). The last two have the advantage that each chapter is a stand-alone essay, which is especially good if your attention span is shortened by summer distractions.

  • How to Bake Pi by Cheng
  • The Man Who Knew Infinity by Kanigel (now a major motion picture!)
  • Here’s Looking at Euclid by Bellos (also a math columnist for The Guardian)
  • The Joy of X by Strogatz (originally an essay series for The New York Times)

One more suggestion for your reading list is to catch up on an NCTM journal article you meant to read this year but didn’t have time to.  There are free previews of some articles on the website if you aren’t yet a member.

LEARN SOMETHING NEW (anything! Doesn’t have to be math-related.)  If you come back to school in the fall and share your experience with your students, they will see you as a learner and it may encourage their efforts.  Here are some ideas:

Watch a webinar.  Did you miss one this year you meant to join?  On-demand recordings are easily paused so you can take notes or try a problem yourself.  For example, Texas Instruments has an archive of their free webinars here.

Go to a workshop/class/conference. There are plenty of these available in person and online.  Your department or district may have local offerings.  The TI Teachers Teaching with Technology PD workshops are listed here, and include “virtual” workshops as well.  Jo Boaler’s YouCubed organization offers an online course for teachers “How to Learn Math” [info here].

For my Connecticut and New England colleagues, two great opportunities are nearby.  The T3 Northeast PD Summit is June 22 & 23 in New Britain, covering both the TI-84+ and TI-Nspire [info here and sign up here].  And the Geogebra Institute of Southern CT is holding their 4th annual conference in New Haven on August 16 [info here], including a pre-conference workshop August 15 for beginners.

MAKE A PLAN.  One of the best things for me about being a teacher is the chance to revise and improve my teaching practice on a regular basis.  Some years I taught the same course to more than one class, so each lesson got two or three tries in the same day (or week).  I reflected on how it went with the first group and made adjustments and improvements for the next class.  Remembering the details for the next school year is harder to do, so I would make quick notes right in my lesson plan to capture the changes I’d like to try in the future.  Here is the reminder I used as the last item on my “Lesson Plan Template”:border self eval

If you have notes from this year about lessons you’d like to modify, find them before leaving the building for the summer.

In 1994, Steve Leinwand wrote an article in Mathematics Teacher  “Four Teacher-Friendly Postulates for Thriving in a Sea of Change”.  One of them has resonated with me ever since then:  “It is unreasonable to ask a professional to change much more than 10% a year, but it is unprofessional to change by much less than 10% a year.”  While many of us try to change and improve our teaching each year (or are asked/mandated to implement new practices), change is challenging and daunting.  Leinwand suggests that teachers consider changing about 10% of what they do each school year, a very reasonable amount (just one new lesson every two weeks, or one unit out of the ten you teach).  What will be your 10%?  What topic/class/unit needs work?  Get a jump start this summer on something you’d like to teach differently than you’ve taught it before.

So, take this as your summer assignment: PICK SOMETHING you intend to do to learn and grow professionally this summer, along with your plans to decompress and have fun.  Let me know how it goes.  Have a wonderful summer!


NOTES & RESOURCES:

Leinwand, Steven. (1994).  Four Teacher-Friendly Postulates for Thriving in a Sea of Change. Mathematics Teacher 87(6):392–393. [Reprinted in 2007 during 100th anniversary of MT, with commentary by Cathy Seeley: Mathematics Teacher 100(9):580-583.]

More on  Recreational math books here: Math-Frolic.